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History

History

A Proud Storied Past

Since it’s founding in 1826, Lake Champlain Transportation Company ferries have been navigating the waters of Lake Champlain.

At the end of the 19th Century the ferries provided important commercial transportation for goods and lumber. At that time Burlington was the country’s third largest lumber port. The ferries also offered a luxurious form of leisure travel.

Through the years, with the advent of railroads and then the automobile, the steam powered ferries nearly disappeared.

Today modern ferries are an integral part of the lake and they are a welcome sight for both commuters and visitors.

Two Centuries of Tradition

1826

October 26, 1826

The Champlain Transportation Company Incorporated by Vermont State Legislature Luther Loomis President

1827

Julius Hoyt, President of Champlain Transportation Company.

1828

William A Griswold, President of Champlain Transportation Company.

1833

February 22, 1833 Absorbed the Lake Champlain Steamboat Company

1835

January 27, 1835 Purchased the Champlain Ferry Company

1840

United States President Martin Van Buren travels on the steamboat Burlington

1846

Henry H Ross, President of Champlain Transportation Company.

1849

Several directors of the Champlain Transportation Company sell their holdings to investors headed by Daniel Drew and Nelson Robinson giving them control of the Company. Oscar Burton, President of Champlain Transportation Company.

1852

September, Rutland and Burlington Railroad purchases all the steamboats and real estate from the Champlain Transportation Company. (Champlain Transportation Company retained its charter)

1854

Autumn, Rutland and Burlington Railroad make arrangements to re-sell the steamboats and real estate back to the Champlain Transportation Company.

1860

Lemuel H Tupper, President of Champlain Transportation Company.

1861

Civil War

1864

LeGrand B Cannon, President of Champlain Transportation Company.

1868

Champlain Transportation Company owns a controlling interest in The Lake George Steamboat Company

1870

The Delaware and Hudson Canal Company purchases the Champlain Transportation Company From the Rensselaer and Saratoga Rail Road who held a controlling interest in the Champlain Transportation Company.

1872

Lake George Steamboat Company regains control and becomes independent.

1888

The Chateaugay becomes the first steel hulled boat built on Lake Champlain.

1895

James Roosevelt, President of Champlain Transportation Company.

1899

The Delaware and Hudson Canal Company changes its name to The Delaware and Hudson Company

1901

Horace G Young, President of Champlain Transportation Company.

1903

David Willcox, President of Champlain Transportation Company.

1903

Launch of the Steamboat Vermont (III) the largest boat ever to slide down the ways at Shelburne Shipyard.

1906

The steamer Ticonderoga is launched at Shelburne Shipyard.

1907

Leonor F Loree, President of Champlain Transportation Company.

1917

United States enters World War I

1927

November 4, 1927 “The flood of 1927” Steamboat Chateaugay is pressed into service to carry refugees, mail and emergency supplies between Port Kent NY and Burlington VT.

1929

October 29 “Black Tuesday” The great depression.

1933

Champlain Transportation Company’s revenue plummeted in 1930, 1931, and 1932 resulting in the suspension of operations beginning January 25, 1933. However, general manager Daniel Loomis made arrangements to continue steamer service by leasing the Chateaugay for the Burlington to Port Kent run.

1936

Delaware and Hudson Company again, takes over operations of the Champlain Transportation Company.

1937

Champlain Transportation Company sold to Horace W Corbin

1941

United States enters World War II

1948

Horace W Corbin sells Champlain Transportation Company to Lewis P Evans, Richard Wadhams, and James Wolcott who formed a new corporation, the Lake Champlain Transportation Company. Lewis P Evans President

1953

Steamer Ticonderoga is moved across land to her final resting spot at the Shelburne Museum in Shelburne, Vermont. Bringing a close to steamboats on Lake Champlain.

1976

Ray Pecor Jr. purchases Lake Champlain Transportation Company. Ray Pecor Jr President

1976

Beginning of year-round operation at the Grand Isle crossing.

1992

Henry Sorrell President of Lake Champlain Transportation Company

1999

January 1 1999, Start of 24-hour service at the Grand Isle crossing.

1999

Ray Pecor III joins his father in the ferry business.

2000

Ray Pecor III becomes President of Lake Champlain Transportation Company.

2003

Ray Pecor III purchase Lake Champlain Transportation Company from Ray Pecor Jr.

2010

M/V Raymond C. Pecor Jr. was built to LCT’s specifications by Eastern Shipbuilding Group in Panama City, FL. The ferry is named after the previous owner of Lake Champlain Transportation, Ray Pecor Jr. The naming of the RCP Jr. was a surprise to Ray. He was flattered and very gracious when he learned the ferry was named after him.